Понеделник, 21.05.2018, 16:27
Main » Ad Board » ДРЕВЕН ЕГИПЕТ И АФРИКА » Археология

Bob Brier - Cleopatra's Needles: The Lost Obelisks of Egypt
12.05.2018, 12:31

Любопитен разказ за пътешествията по света на древноегипетските обелиски. Тези шедьоври на каменоделските умения започват пътя си в гранитните кариери на Асуан, възправят се в стража на гробниците на владетелите от XVIII династия, превръщат се в най-ценни трофери за римските императори и в крайна сметка в украшение за модерниите мегаполиси- Лондон, Париж, Ню Йорк, Рим... И да се превърнат във вдъхновение за съвременните скулптори и архитекти.

Bob Brier - Cleopatra's Needles: The Lost Obelisks of Egypt, London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2016

 

- на английски език, от Google Docs,формат EPUB. Сваляне с ляв бутон (downloading by left button) от страницата на предоставящия сървър, после през бутона стрелка надолу/after by down arrow button.

 

Added by: Admin | | Tags: дреноегипетски технологии, древноегипетска архитектура, древноегипетска археология, Асуан, обелиски, Древен Египет
Views: 388 | Placed till: 12.06.2018 | Rating: 0.0/0
Total comments: 1
0
1  
In the half-century between 1831 and 1881 three massive obelisks left Egypt for new lands. Prior to these journeys, the last large obelisk moved was the Vatican obelisk in 1586 – one of the great engineering achievements of the Renaissance. Roman emperors moved more than a dozen, but left no records of how they did it. The nineteenth-century engineers entrusted with transporting the obelisks across oceans had to invent new methods, and they were far from certain that they would work. As the three obelisks, bound for Paris, London and New York, sailed towards their new homes, the world held its breath. Newspapers reported the obelisks' daily progress, complete with dramatic illustrations of the heroic deeds of the engineers and crews struggling under nearly impossible conditions. When the obelisks finally arrived safely in their new homes, bands played Cleopatra's Needle Waltz and silver obelisk pencils dangled from fashionable ladies' necks.
This turbulent era, caught up in obelisk mania, is recreated by Bob Brier in all its glory. Amid astounding tales of engineering dexterity and naval endurance, the individuals involved in transporting the obelisks and receiving them in their future homes are brought to life through their letters and diaries, newspaper articles and illustrations. Written by a renowned Egyptologist and author, this compelling book will fascinate all those interested in Egypt, its iconic monuments and the history of great endeavour.
In the half-century between 1831 and 1881 three massive obelisks left Egypt for new lands. Prior to these journeys, the last large obelisk moved was the Vatican obelisk in 1586 – one of the great engineering achievements of the Renaissance. Roman emperors moved more than a dozen, but left no records of how they did it. The nineteenth-century engineers entrusted with transporting the obelisks across oceans had to invent new methods, and they were far from certain that they would work. As the three obelisks, bound for Paris, London and New York, sailed towards their new homes, the world held its breath. Newspapers reported the obelisks' daily progress, complete with dramatic illustrations of the heroic deeds of the engineers and crews struggling under nearly impossible conditions. When the obelisks finally arrived safely in their new homes, bands played Cleopatra's Needle Waltz and silver obelisk pencils dangled from fashionable ladies' necks.
This turbulent era, caught up in obelisk mania, is recreated by Bob Brier in all its glory. Amid astounding tales of engineering dexterity and naval endurance, the individuals involved in transporting the obelisks and receiving them in their future homes are brought to life through their letters and diaries, newspaper articles and illustrations. Written by a renowned Egyptologist and author, this compelling book will fascinate all those interested in Egypt, its iconic monuments and the history of great endeavour.

Only registered users can add comments.
[ Registration | Login ]